SERVICE DELIVERY AND UTILIZATION FOR SUPPLY CHAIN

 

Angele Abegue  meets with a health worker with her children Oraly, 1, and Manda Marie (left), age unknown, at a UNICEF supported health center for people displaced by floods at the Toukra IDP site in N'Djamena, Chad  in  October 22, 2012.  ©UNICEF

Angele Abegue meets with a health worker with her children at a UNICEF supported health center for people displaced by floods at the Toukra IDP site in N’Djamena, Chad in October 22, 2012. ©UNICEF

 

Service delivery and utilization is the last step in the supply chain, where all the inputs at higher levels of the chain, such as procurement and distribution, become the output to be consumed by the beneficiaries of the health system. Without effective service delivery, none of the commodities moved through the supply chain reach the people who need them.

 

What is the problem?

Service delivery and utilization are complex because they occur at several levels of the public health system and also in the private sector. Basic commodities and care are delivered at health centers (public and private). More specialized commodities and care are administered at hospitals. With increasing frequency, individuals are able to receive health services and consume commodities at the community level through such mechanisms as public sector community health workers (CHWs) or volunteers, community-based distribution agents, and private sector shops and pharmacies.

There are numerous barriers at the level of the service delivery point (SDP) that inhibit successful service delivery and utilization, such as competing priorities for health center staff, accessing hard to reach communities, lack of community engagement or unfavorable pricing for the privates sector.

Promising Practices

The Supply Chain Technical Resource Team (TRT) highlighted good practices for addressing common barriers to service delivery and utilization. In addition, because service delivery happens in so many locations throughout a country, insufficient human resources to staff and support each SDP may be a significant barrier. Detailed information on addressing human resource issues is available in the Promising Practices in Human Resources brief.

The Demand, Access & Performance TRT is looking at the larger issue of creating demand for commodities that successfully make it through the supply chain though for example the publication of an demand generation implementation kit (I-Kit) which provides a step-by-step guide on how to create demand generation communication strategies for family planning, maternal and newborn health and child health commodities.

table service delivery

Read the full Service Delivery and Utilization brief here.

Indicators to Measure Progress in Service Delivery and Utilization

♦ The recommended performance indicator for service delivery and utilization measures the percentage of service delivery points that offer clients access to life-saving commodities and services.

♦ An additional indicator is the percentage of service delivery points expected to offer the service that have at least one active trained health worker.

Read the full Supply Chain Performance Indicators Guidance here.

KEY ACTIVITIES

The Supply Chain Technical Resource Team (TRT) supported the development of the Promising Practices in Service Delivery & Utilization brief to advocate for investment in best practices for human resources for supply chain.